Residencies

Updated 3/15/24

Residency #1 Legal Foundations

Residency #2 Legal Applications

Residency #3/4 Professional Skills

Residency #5/6 Advanced Legal Topics

Legal Foundations is the first in-person residency and is required prior to starting online live class sessions. If you are unable to make this residency in person, due to our ABA guidelines, you will be asked to re-apply the following year. This residency usually takes place the second full week of August at the start of your first semester.

This intensive, five-day, 25-hour course provides an introduction to the legal system of the United States and an introduction to the study of law. By the end of this week, you will understand the structure of the US government and legal system and its provisions, laws, statutes, and agencies. You will know the basic structure of the court systems and understand study methods and skills utilized in law school. This week also includes meeting and networking with your new classmates along with the staff, faculty and alumni of Syracuse Law. You will be officially welcomed into the Syracuse Law community along with the JDresidential 1L incoming class. It is a busy and very eventful week in Syracuse!

You will arrive in Syracuse on Sunday evening and depart Friday afternoon. For 2024, confirmed dates are Sunday, August 11 through Friday, August 16, 2024. We set up blocks of hotels nearby. Most of your meals and all program events will be covered by your residency fee. If you have questions, please send us a message! Hotel and airfare are not included.

Sunday, August 11 is evening check-in and reception from 4-7PM. Monday through Friday class starts at 9AM. There are evening events after class, so some evenings will be late! One morning mid-week, we will have an alumni breakfast and groups starting at 8AM, and Friday’s class will end at 12 noon so that you can get home Friday afternoon. A more detailed schedule will be posted in the coming weeks! Keep checking back.

Legal Applications LAW 793 is the second residency week and takes place at the beginning of your second semester of law school, in early January. It is held on the Syracuse Campus and is a five or six-day, 37.5-hour course. We set up blocks of hotels nearby and you can either drive and park at the law school, walk from the nearby hotels, or use SU campus transportation between the hotels and your classes and events. Most of your meals and all program events will be covered by your residency fee. Hotel and airfare are not included.

Hotel blocks have been set up and can be accessed on the hotels page. For 2025, this residency will take place Monday, January 6 at 8am through Friday, January 10 at 2pm. Please schedule travel to ensure on time arrival in Syracuse. For residency attire, unless otherwise specified you should always plan to be comfortable yet appropriate and professional for both your time in the classroom and the law school in general.

Professional Skills LAW 893 is the third residency week and takes place at the beginning of your fifth semester of law school, in early January. It is held on the Syracuse Campus and is a six-day, 37.5-hour course that satisfies the requirement for residencies #3 and #4. You will have the opportunity to choose which Professional Skills courses you take, totaling 3 credits. We set up blocks of hotels nearby and you can either drive and park at the law school, walk from the nearby hotels, or use SU campus transportation between the hotels and your classes and events. Most of your meals and all program events will be covered by your residency fee. Hotel and airfare are not included.

For 2025, this residency will take place Monday, January 6 at 8am through Friday, January 10 at 5pm. Schedules will be posted below in Fall 2024. Listed below are the sample options for January 2024 – some of these will change for 2025.

To be posted Fall 2024.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Negotiation as Lawyer
Offered W – Su 8am – 12pm OR W – Su 1:30pm – 5:30pm (2 sections), 1.5 credits
Taught by Professor Elizabeth August L’94, Teaching Professor

The course will introduce students to skills necessary for successful negotiation through readings, lecture, simulations, reflections and class discussions. Students will negotiate throughout the week both individually and in teams. Students will learn the importance of preparation, style, fact gathering and strategy in negotiation through simulations involving transactions, litigation settlements and employment issues, among others. Students must attend all classes for the entire class period to receive credit in the course. Some negotiations will be videotaped. Students who attend all class sessions, participate fully and productively in the simulations and class discussions, and complete all course assignments will receive a pass for the course.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Trial Advocacy, BSK Courtroom
Offered W – Su 8am – 5:30pm* This is an all-day 3 credit class. If you register for Trial Advocacy, this will be the only class you take this residency.  Attire for the last day of class only (Sunday) is Courtroom Attire for final trials, aka Business/Suits.
Taught by Professor Todd Berger, Professor of Law; Director, Advocacy Programs

The aim of this course is to help students develop skills as trial advocates while emphasizing social and professional responsibility. The scope of the course includes:

  1. Development of an analytical framework for advocacy problems.
  2. Contextual understanding of the law of evidence.
  3. Appreciation and understanding of the obligations of the advocate to his/her client.
  4. Recognition of limits of advocacy.
  5. Understanding the relationship between trial advocacy and pre-trial litigation.
  6. Experimentation with different modes and styles of advocacy.

In order to accomplish these goals each student will perform as trial counsel in a variety of simulated courtroom exercises. Every student will engage in direct examination, cross examination, introduction of exhibits, opening statements and closing arguments. In addition, every student will act as counsel in one full trial. This is an introductory course in which we hope to lay the foundation for your future development as a trial lawyer.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Model Rules to Role Models: Legal Ethics in National Security Practice
Offered W – Su 8am – 12pm, 1.5 credits Attire: Casual Professional
Taught by Hon. James E. Baker, Professor of Law; Director, Institute for Security Policy and Law

This course addresses ethical challenges that arise in national security policy and legal practice. To prepare students to better meet these challenges, the course considers: (1) the rules of professional responsibility in the context of national security practice; (2) tools and values that should guide conduct in moments of stress and challenge; and, (3) role models whose ethical conduct and moral courage we might seek to emulate. The course is premised on the belief that ethics and moral courage are better learned from the identification and emulation of positive examples than through the avoidance of negative examples or the promulgation of prohibitions. To help students find their voices as counselors as well as lawyers, students will present their own role models to the class as well as address realistic ethical scenarios.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Advanced Litigation Skills
Offered W – Su 8am – 12pm, 1.5 credits Attire: Casual Professional
Taught by Professor Kristin Walker L’08, Professor of Practice; Faculty Director of Externships

Approximately 90% of civil cases never reach trial. The savvy litigator knows how to navigate the pretrial process, whereby most civil cases resolve. This experiential course offers a modern approach to litigation advocacy where aspiring litigators learn to assess a civil matter from the start, build a case theory, and strategize its best path to resolution. Learning how to advocate for your client before and during the early stages of a lawsuit allows a litigator to identify which cases to settle; which cases to sue; and which to try. This course will focus on topics which span the pretrial process timeline, from initial client contact, early case investigation, and negotiations; to initiating a lawsuit, discovery strategy, depositions, motion practice, and alternative dispute resolution. A combination of classroom discussion, written assignments, and practical simulations will be used to develop best practices within the pretrial process.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Criminal Investigations: Essential Lawyering Skills
Offered W – Su 8am – 12pm, 1.5 credits Attire: Casual Professional
Taught by Professor Shannon Gardner, Associate Dean for Online Education; Teaching Professor

This course explores the roles and duties of both prosecutors and defense attorneys in the pre-indictment/investigatory phase of criminal cases. Students will learn the various investigative tools utilized (including administrative and grand jury subpoenas, search warrants, and wiretaps), and the lawyering skills necessary in the pre-indictment phase (including interviewing, researching and drafting, and developing a compelling case theory). Students will have daily opportunities to engage in and practice these skills, including drafting a search warrant affidavit, researching potential criminal charges and drafting a charging document, interviewing a witness, and conducting a defense presentation. Students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking and attention to detail and precision, and also to consider the roles of prosecutors and defense attorneys in our criminal justice system.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Media Training for Attorneys
Offered W – Su 8am – 12pm, 1.5 credits Attire for the last day of class only (Sunday) is “Camera Ready Business Attire” and will be held at the Dick Clark Studios.
Taught by Professor Kevin Maillard, Professor of Law

Effective communication skills are crucial for public advocacy. It is more than public speaking—it is the conveyance of a clear, unified message related through different formats: radio, television, and news.
Using a single case study, the course will cover crafting a message, writing and pitching an op-ed, and media training. On the final day, there will be a taped on-camera interview in a mock studio with camera, lights, and sound. This course builds life skills that all attorneys will need at some point in their lives, and it helps the students gain confidence in speaking and writing for a public audience.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Administrative Representation for Veterans – Restoration of Honor
Offered W – Su 8am – 12pm, 1.5 credits Attire: Casual Professional
Taught by Professor Beth Kubala, Teaching Professor & Executive Director, Wohl Veterans Legal Clinic

Administrative Representation for Veterans is an experiential course that will provide students the opportunity to represent real clients in an administrative process with a goal of changing a veteran’s character of service. The class will include analyzing administrative law as it applies to the military services; reviewing extensive personnel and medical files; developing and engaging in military cultural competency; client interviewing; and learning about the military justice system. Students will prepare a written brief in support of an application to a military Discharge Review Board or Board of Correction for Military Records.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Oral Communication and Advocacy Skills
Offered W – Su 1:30pm – 5:30pm, 1.5 credits Attire for the last day of class only (Sunday) is Courtroom Attire for final oral arguments, aka Business/Suits.
Taught by Professor Danielle Wild L’15, Visiting Professor

In this residential course, students will develop and hone their oral communication and advocacy skills. Students will learn not only how to effectively argue in court and give superlative courtroom presentations, but also how to engage in challenging dialogue with judges, colleagues, and clients. Students will polish their public speaking skills, practice thinking on their feet, and improve self-confidence as oral communicators. This class is appropriate for students of all skill levels.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 –Lawyer as Counselor
Offered W – Su 1:30pm – 5:30pm, 1.5 credits Attire: Casual Professional
Taught by Professor Gary Pieples, Teaching Professor; Director, Criminal Defense Clinic

We will learn and practice the basic skills of client interviewing and counseling. Interviewing and counseling are the foundational skills of lawyering. Many other lawyering skills (depositions, courtroom advocacy, witness examination, and negotiation) build upon these foundational skills. This is an experiential learning course designed to meet the ABA and NY Bar experiential learning requirement. We will conduct multiple exercises each day and your grade will reflect, in part, your participation in these exercises.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – Title IX Investigations
Offered W – Su 1:30pm – 5:30pm, 1.5 credits Attire: Casual Professional
Taught by Professor Lynn Levey, Distinguished Lecturer

This course will introduce students to the legislation and policy related to Title IX, federal law that prohibits gender discrimination in an educational setting. Students will learn how to investigate allegations of sexual violence on a university campus between students. They will practice interviewing techniques and write an investigative report in accordance with university policy, for non-lawyers in an administrative proceeding. Students will use information obtained from interviews, to write an investigative report, suitable for an administrative hearing. Students will learn to determine what information to include or omit, and, to understand how to write an investigation report for multiple audiences and purposes.

They will also learn about the many steps involved in a Title IX investigation and the different roles lawyers may play. There will be numerous opportunities to discuss and practice interviewing techniques. Issues related to trauma-informed interview techniques will also be discussed.

LAW 893 Professional Skills 3/4 – “eQuality”: The Right to Equal Access to the Web under the Americans with Disabilities Act

Offered W – Su 1:30pm – 5:30pm, 1.5 credits Attire: Casual Professional
Taught by Professor Peter Blanck, University Professor; Chairman, Burton Blatt Institute

This course will introduce students to “eQuality” or the right to equal access to the web under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). Students will gain a deeper understanding of the applicability of the ADA to the Web and other digital environments through experiential exercises, readings, class discussions, guest presentations, and related assignments. This course encompasses four main topics:

How people with disabilities access the Web

Students will learn the many ways people with disabilities access the Web using assistive technologies including screen magnification software, screen reader software, keyboard-only navigation, and voice command. Guest presenter, professor, Stephen Kuusisto will share his experiences and the essential role of assistive technology and digital access in his personal and professional life.

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)

Students will familiarize themselves with the W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) including hierarchy, intent, conformance levels and applicability to the law. SU Director of Digital Accessibility Marla Runyan will lead the class through the review and analysis of WCAG principles and success criteria.

Web Accessibility and the ADA

Students will review and analyze the statutory law of Title II and Title III of the ADA, related regulations, and controlling case law across respective jurisdictions. Additionally, we will review the 2023 ADA Title II Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) published by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the 2023 Dear Colleague letter published jointly by the DOJ and Department of Education related to online accessibility in postsecondary education.  We will also review and analyze the seminal case, National Federation of the Blind v. Target Stores (N.D. Cal.). Guest presenter, SUCOL law graduate, Bruce Sexton, who is blind and was an initial named plaintiff will share his story. Professor Blanck served as pro bono counsel in this case.

Disability Law in Practice

By engaging with practicing disability rights attorneys, students will learn about the practice of disability law, digital accessibility matters, and career prospects in this unique and rewarding area of practice.

Advanced Legal Topics LAW 994 is offered several times throughout the year for students who have completed their first four residencies. Students are expected to complete two of these Advanced Topics Residencies, which are held in Syracuse or at off-campus locations. Each Advanced residency runs for 4-5 days and is considered a deep dive into a particular subject. These courses are taught by professionals in the field, alumni, and College of Law professors. Some topics have included Arbitration, Corporate Law in a Sustainable World, General Counsel, Bankruptcy, Franchising, Crypto-Currency, and Disability Law.

Upcoming #5/6 Residency Offerings:

*Pre-enrollment for these residencies took place via Qualtrics survey. If you are still interested in participating in the courses below, you can request enrollment on MySlice or by completing a Student Service Request form. For more information, email Stephanie Rinko, JDi Program Coordinator.

Taught by Jack Graves, Teaching Professor – confirmed Tuesday, January 2 at 2pm to Friday, January 5 at 5pm, 2024 in Denver, CO.

This course is intended to provide a substantial introduction to the law and practice of arbitration, as a legally binding and fully enforceable mechanism for resolution of commercial and other disputes. Along with U.S. federal law specifically governing arbitration, we will also encounter a variety of institutional arbitration rules, elements of federal labor law, international laws governing arbitration, and an international treaty supporting global enforcement of arbitration agreements and awards. This is not a skills course, as such, but it will include a significant focus on practical aspects of arbitration, including drafting of effective arbitration agreements, enforcing such arbitration agreements when a dispute arises, conducting fair and efficient arbitration proceedings, and enforcing any final award rendered by the arbitrator(s). By the end of this intensive course, you should have a sound basic understanding of the use of arbitration as a means of conclusively resolving legal disputes, along with an understanding of many of the issues that most commonly arise in drafting and implementing agreements to arbitrate.

Date Event Time Location
Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2024 Intro to Class 2pm – 6:30pm (below is part of class time) The AC Hotel, 750 15th Street
Attire: Business Casual Fireside Chat with Mark A.  Neporent L’82, Board of Advisors 5pm – 6:30pm Sherman & Howard LLC, 675 15th Street
Dinner 6:30pm Dinner on your own
Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2024 Class 9am – 12pm, 1pm-5pm Sherman & Howard LLC, 675 15th Street
Attire: Business Casual Lunch 12pm – 1pm Lunch on your own
Alumni Reception 5:30pm – 7:30pm Wynkoop Brewing Co*, 1634 18th Street, Denver
Thursday, Jan. 4, 2024 Class 9am – 12pm, 1pm-5pm Sherman & Howard LLC
Attire: Casual appropriate professional school attire  Lunch 12pm – 1pm Lunch on your own
Friday, Jan. 5, 2024 Class 9am – 12pm, 1pm-5pm Sherman & Howard LLC
Attire: Casual appropriate professional school attire  Lunch 12pm – 1pm Lunch on your own

*Wynkoop Brewing Co. Address: 1634 18th Street, Denver. The reception is about a 15-minute walk from the firm, or you can use the RTD System to get from Sherman & Howard to Wynkoop by locating a nearby stop (15th St. & Welton St.) and taking the train to 18th St. and Blake St. 3-hour passes are $3.00.  

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – International Tax Law

Taught by Craig M. Boise, Dean and Professor of Law – confirmed dates Saturday, March 9 to Sunday, March 17, 2024 in Geneva & Saas-Fee, Switzerland.

Travel to Switzerland over spring break to gain exposure to the foundational principles of international tax law and develop an understanding of (i) international tax law, tax competition, and the practice of international tax law in Civil Law and Common Law jurisdictions; (ii) concepts of business and tax advising relative to transfer pricing, Base Erosion & Profiting Shifting (BEPS), measuring risk and intangibles, and related topics; and (iii) common reporting standards under the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD); the application of various tax regimes; information reporting standards, monitoring, enforcement and related issues.
 
Class size is limited to 20 students. Students who enroll in this course must participate in both the Syracuse and European portions of the program. After your pre-enrollment is complete and accepted, an application through the Study Abroad office is required.

*Note: The drop deadline for short-term Study Abroad courses is November 15, 2023.*

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – Comparative Legal Systems

Taught by Luca Arnaudo, Distinguished Lecturer – confirmed dates Sunday, March 10 to Friday, March 15, 2024 in Rome, Italy.

This course introduces the most relevant contemporary legal families (including civil law and common law) by means of a comparative method through a selection of broad topics and case studies. Topics discussed will include forms of government, sources of law, and fundamental issues such as property rights. This course will not only allow students to learn about legal systems different from the American legal system, but also to better understand and appreciate the American legal system by an evaluation of its place on the world stage.

After your pre-enrollment is complete and accepted, an application through the Study Abroad office is required. More details to follow.

*Note: The drop deadline for short-term Study Abroad courses is November 15, 2023.*

Date Event Time Location
Sunday, March 10, 2024 Verso Sera: Group Dinner 19h30- 21h30 Verso Sera,

Piazza del Biscione, 84 00186 Roma RM Italia
Monday, March 11, 2024 Breakfast 8:30 – 9h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
Lectures 9 – 12h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
  Lunch Break 12 – 14h On your own
  Lectures 14 – 16h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
  Pasta & Tiramisu Cooking Class

(Attendees only)

18 – 20h InRome Cooking Classes, Corso del Rinascimento 65, 2nd Floor

Note: Please be there 20 minutes before the class begin. Be sure you bring 94 euros cash.

Tuesday, March 12, 2024 Breakfast 8:30 – 9h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
Lectures 9 – 12h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
  Lunch Break 12 – 14h On your own
  Seminar 14 – 17h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
Wednesday, March 13, 2024 Breakfast 8:30 – 9h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
Lectures 9 – 12h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
  Lunch Break 12 – 15h On your own
  Study Visit 15 – 17h Off-site visit: Constitutional Courthouse, Piazza del Quirinale, 41 00187 Roma
Thursday, March 14, 2024 Breakfast 8:30 – 9h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
Lectures 9 – 11h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
  Lunch Break 11 – 15h On your own
  Study Visit 15 – 17h *Off-site visit: Curtis Law Firm, Piazza Venezia, 11 Roma, Lazio 00187
Cocktail Reception with Professor Arnaudo and Local Attorneys 17 – 19h *Off-site visit: Curtis Law Firm, Piazza Venezia, 11 Roma, Lazio 00187
Friday, March 15, 2024 Breakfast 8:30 – 9h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy
Exam & Final Seminar 9 – 12h UW Rome Center, Piazza del Biscione, 95, 00186, Rome Italy

*Off-site visit: Manfredi De Vita | Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle LLP

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – Bankruptcy Law

Taught by Richard Levy, Jr L’77, Distinguished Lecturer and Bankruptcy & Creditors’ Rights Counselor and Litigator at Pryor Cashman, LLP – confirmed dates Tuesday, March 12 at 2pm to Saturday, March 16, 2024, at 12:30pm in Los Angeles, CA.

Through the primary lenses of statutory language, procedural rules and case law, this course explores the rights and treatment of secured and unsecured creditors under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, the protections available to individuals and businesses in bankruptcy cases, and the manner by which bankruptcy cases and adversary proceedings are administered under Chapters 7, 11 and 13 of the Bankruptcy Code and associated provisions of the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure. The course also surveys a range of creditor remedies under state laws affecting creditors’ rights, including enforcement of judgments, perfection of commercial and real estate liens, and recovery of fraudulent transfers. The instructor is assisted with guest lectures by United States Bankruptcy Judges and a federal bankruptcy trustee.

Date Event Time Location
Tuesday, March 12, 2024

Dress code: neat dress appropriate for class/law firm.

Class 2pm – 6:30pm  *light dinner served Silver Lake Room, InterContinental Hotel, 900 Wilshire Blvd.
Wednesday, March 13, 2024

Dress code: neat dress appropriate for class/law firm.

Class 8:30am – 12pm *breakfast served 8am Goodwin Procter, LLP, 601 S. Figueroa St, Suite 4100
Lunch on your own 12pm – 1pm
Class 1pm – 4:30pm Guest Speaker Melanie Gray L’81
Fireside chat with Melanie Gray L’81 4:30pm – 6pm Goodwin Procter, LLP, 601 S. Figueroa St, Suite 4100
Thursday, March 14, 2024

Dress code: business attire for courthouse, Judges, and alumni reception.

Class 9am – 12:30pm *breakfast served 8am Goodwin Procter, LLP, 601 S. Figueroa St, Suite 4100
Lunch on your own 12:30pm – 2pm
Class & Presentation 2pm – 5pm Bankruptcy Courthouse, 255 E. Temple St.

-> Must bring your valid photo ID <-

Alumni Event 5:30pm – 7:30pm El Paseo Inn, 11 Olvera Street
Friday, March 15, 2024

Dress code: neat dress appropriate for class/law firm.

Class 9am – 1pm *breakfast served 8am Goodwin Procter, LLP, 601 S. Figueroa St, Suite 4100
Lunch on your own 1pm – 2pm
Class 2pm – 5pm Goodwin Procter, LLP, 601 S. Figueroa St, Suite 4100
Saturday, March 16, 2024

Dress code: neat dress appropriate for class/law firm.

Class 9am – 12:30pm *breakfast served 9-11am Roosevelt Room, InterContinental Hotel, 900 Wilshire Blvd.

 

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – Federal Practice and International Law in the U.S. Legal System

Taught by Yan Bennett, L’08 – confirmed dates Tuesday, April 23 to Friday*, April 26, 2024 in Washington, DC.
*Note: Please plan to stay in DC through Friday evening to partake in a special event at Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.*

What does it mean to practice international law? What constitutional authorities allow for American relations with foreign governments and international organizations? And within the context of the federal system, how does this translate into functional practice? This course explores the American interpretation of international law, the interconnections between domestic law and foreign relations, and the constitutional and statutory bases for the practice of international law within the federal law system. This course also explores the notion of a rules-based world order and what role the United States should play in international leadership.

In this course, students will discuss International Law in the U.S. Legal System (2020) among other readings that will illuminate student understanding on the practice of international law within the federal law system. Guest lecturers from federal government departments and agencies as well from private practitioners of international law will also be invited. Students will be surveyed upon enrollment to understand what topics they would like explore in this course, which could include international energy law, cybersecurity, sanctioning, climate action, environmental law, treaty negotiation, and so on. Guest lecturers will also provide some insight into career options and professional development.

Date Event Time Location
Tuesday, April 23, 2024 Class 9am – 12pm South Carolina Room, Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Ave NW
  Class 1pm – 5pm South Carolina Room, Mayflower Hotel
  Welcome Reception 5:30pm – 7pm Mayflower Hotel
Wednesday, April 24, 2024 Class 9am – 12pm South Carolina Room, Mayflower Hotel
  Class 1pm  – 5pm South Carolina Room, Mayflower Hotel
Thursday, April 25, 2024 Class 9am – 12pm South Carolina Room, Mayflower Hotel
  Class 1pm – 5pm South Carolina Room, Mayflower Hotel
Friday, April 26, 2024 Class 9am – 5pm South Carolina Room, Mayflower Hotel
Alumni Event 5pm – 7pm Morgan Lewis & Bockius, 1111 Pennsylvania Ave NW

Note: Breakfast and lunch will be on your own. We will have coffee/beverages and light snacks set up during the breaks throughout the day.

Taught by Nina Kohn – confirmed dates Tuesday, April 23 to Friday, April 26, 2024 in Washington, DC.  *Note: Please plan to stay in DC through Friday evening to partake in a special event at Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.*

This course surveys significant issues in elder law. It aims to do so in a way that is not only interesting for the general law school population, but also practical for those considering a career that involves advising older adults and those who may be called upon to assist elderly friends and family members. Topics of study will include among other things, ethical issues in representing older adults; age discrimination; income maintenance and the social security system; access to health care and the role of Medicare and Medicaid; senior housing (including nursing home and assisted living issues); advance planning and guardianship; and elder abuse and neglect. Particular attention will be paid to the impact that cognitive and physical impairments can have on legal rights and the ability to exercise those rights.

Date Event Time Location
Tuesday, April 23, 2024 Class 9am – 5pm Virginia  Room, Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Ave NW
  Welcome Reception 5:30pm – 7pm Mayflower Hotel
Wednesday, April 24, 2024 Class 9am – 5pm Dechert LLP, 1900 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006
Thursday, April 25, 2024 Class 9am – 5pm Virginia Room, Mayflower Hotel
Friday, April 26, 2024 Class 9am – 5pm Virginia Room, Mayflower Hotel
Alumni Event 5pm – 7pm Morgan Lewis & Bockius, 1111 Pennsylvania Ave NW

Note: Breakfast and lunch will be on your own. We will have coffee/beverages and light snacks set up during the breaks throughout the day.

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – The Corporate Lawyer in a Sustainable World: In-House Lawyering for Sustainability/Responsible Sourcing Programs

Taught by Prashanth Jayachandran, G’98, L’98, Chief Supply Chain Counsel at Colgate-Palmolive – confirmed dates Thursday, April 25 to Sunday, April 28, 2024 in Washington, DC.

We look forward to welcoming back alumnus PJ Jayachandran, G’98, L’98, for an off-site Advanced Legal Topics residency in Washington, DC. The purpose of the course is to provide students an in-depth understanding and knowledge of the role of modern day in-house counsel in giving legal and business advice for global corporate sustainability programs, with a focus on responsible sourcing and diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI).

Over the past several years, multinational corporations have developed robust corporate sustainability programs, focused on a wide spectrum of areas. From reducing their carbon footprint to promoting DEI in the workplace to combating modern slavery in the supply chain, corporate sustainability is at the heart of global corporate strategies.

The focus on sustainability initially began as corporate “citizenship,” a recognition that corporations have a vital role to play in promoting and maintaining a sustainable world. In recent years, however, voluntary sustainability initiatives have intersected with increasing global compliance. For instance, a growing list of countries have passed legislation requiring companies to publicly disclose their efforts to combat modern slavery. Sustainability laws in the areas of plastics and climate are prevalent, particularly in Europe (i.e., The EU Green Deal). If you mix in traditional labor and employment laws, environmental laws, and other global legal structures, a corporate sustainability program must have competent and versatile in-house lawyering to ensure compliance and business viability.

Date Event Time Location
Thursday, April 25, 2024 Class 9am – 5pm Miller & Chevalier, 900 16th St NW
Friday, April 26, 2024 Class 9am – 5pm Morgan Lewis & Bockius, 1111 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Reception 5pm – 7pm Morgan Lewis & Bockius
Saturday, April 27, 2024 Class 9am – 5pm South Carolina, Room, Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Ave NW
Sunday, April 28, 2024 Class 9am – 12pm South Carolina Room, Mayflower Hotel

Note: Lunch will be provided by the law firms on Thursday and Friday during working panel discussions. Lunch will be on your own on Saturday and Sunday. We will have coffee/beverages and light snacks set up during the breaks throughout the day.

Comparative Trial Advocacy in London

Professor Todd Berger, London, England

Now in its second year, students will spend one week in London (July 8-12) gaining exposure to various aspects of trial advocacy in a global setting and hearing from a diversity of perspectives and insights from London’s barristers and solicitors representing a wide cross-section of criminal and civil practice areas. Full course details can be found online here.

Pre-Registration Required: All students intending to enroll must submit a pre-registration form found online here (now open!) by the deadline of January 26 at 12:00 (noon) EDT.

*Pre-enrollment for these residencies will take place via Qualtrics survey. Please keep an eye on emails starting in late March/early April, 2024. Our 2024-2025 Academic Year ALT Residencies will be posted here as they are confirmed:

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – Crypto and Digital Assets: Lawyering for This Century and Beyond

Taught by Jack Graves, Teaching Professor – tentative dates Thursday, August 15 to Sunday, August 18, 2024 in Syracuse, NY.

This course will provide a substantial introduction to the history, nature, and uses of digital assets based on blockchain technology. We will explore different forms of fungible and non-fungible tokens (i.e., digital assets) as well as their emerging uses in decentralized finance and other commercial and data-driven transactions. Having mastered these basic concepts, we will next turn to various regulatory regimes and other legal issues potentially affecting digital assets and their use. We will focus particularly on securities regulation but will also survey a broad range of other potentially relevant federal and state laws. Finally, we will consider the application of this law just surveyed to both current and anticipated use cases, as well as future potential challenges and opportunities just beyond our current horizons.

Tentative Schedule for this Residency:

Thursday 8/15 Friday        8/16 Saturday 8/17 Sunday 8/18
Class 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm 9am – 1pm
Lunch 12pm – 1pm 12pm – 1pm 12pm – 1pm Program Ends
Class 1pm – 5pm 1pm – 5pm 1pm – 5pm
Evening TBD TBD TBD

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – Civil Right Litigation

Taught by Katherine A. Macfarlane, Associate Professor and Director, Disability Law & Policy – tentative dates Wednesday, August 14 at 2 p.m. to Sunday, August 18 at 1 p.m. in Syracuse, NY.

This course examines bringing and defending lawsuits alleging violations of federal civil rights laws, including: 42 U.S.C. § 1983 (with respect to actions involving the police and prisons); the American with Disabilities Act; the Fair Housing Act; and Title IX. Discussion of landmark cases will consider their historical context and recent litigation in which the cases have been applied. The course will also address how modern civil rights movements have shaped civil rights litigation. Prior coursework in Constitutional Law II and/or Criminal Procedure is recommended but not required.

Tentative Schedule for this Residency:

Wednesday 8/14 Thursday 8/15 Friday 8/17 Saturday 8/17 Sunday 8/18
Class 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm 9am – 1pm
Lunch 12pm – 1pm 12pm – 1pm 12pm – 1pm Program Ends
Class 2pm – 5pm 1pm – 4pm 1pm – 4pm 1pm – 4pm
Evening TBD TBD TBD TBD

 

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – The Intersections of Immigration and Employment Policy and Law in the Courts, the Agencies and in the Congress

Taught by Randel Johnson, Cornell Distinguished Immigration Scholar – tentative dates Thursday, August 15 at 9 a.m. to Sunday, August 18 at 1 p.m. in Syracuse, NY.

Individual laws, particularly after interpretation by the courts, are inherently complex in and of themselves. Each of these are typically covered in separate courses but in practice entities are often confronted with situations where these laws overlap and even conflict. This course will examine how apparent conflicts are resolved by the courts and ultimately the enforcement agencies, through a review of general statutory interpretation principles and specific court cases examining the interaction of immigration and a variety of employment laws. This review, however, will stretch beyond legal cannons to include the underlying policies of these laws and the Congressional intent which led to their enactment. The course will build on these lessons and illustrate them through discussion of actual negotiations held in the Congress which turned on interpretation of immigration and employment law principles and conflicts, specifically in S.744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act. These issues continue to permeate though the current debates in Congress on immigration reform initiatives.

The goal of the program would be to educate students with sufficient knowledge to identify potential conflicts in statutes which their clients will invariably confront and how to best argue the underlying principles to reach a certain result favorable to their client. Concurrently, students will gain a knowledge of immigration and employment laws and some insight into the “legislative sausage making” of Capitol Hill and the various competing pressures which go into shaping legislation before it becomes law.

Tentative Schedule for this Residency:

Thursday 8/15 Friday 8/17 Saturday 8/17 Sunday 8/18
Class 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm 9am – 1pm
Lunch 12pm – 1pm 12pm – 1pm 12pm – 1pm Program Ends
Class 1pm – 5pm 1pm – 5pm 1pm – 5pm
Evening TBD TBD TBD

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – Consumer Law

Taught by Gary J. Pieples, Director, Criminal Defense Clinic – tentative dates Monday, December 9 to Friday, December 13 in Miami, FL.

An introduction to federal and state regulations of the consumer market including unfair and deceptive practices; consumer credit regulation including truth in lending, usury, and predatory finance; debt collection; warranties; credit reporting, and privacy. We will explore how a federal fee-shifting statutes create opportunities for entrepreneurial law graduates. Students will review and analyze consumer contracts and statutes and drafts legal documents based upon real world scenarios.

Schedule- TBA

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics 5/6 – Mediation

Taught by Theodore Bayer, Distinguished Lecturer – tentative dates Monday, December 9 to Friday, December 13 in Miami, FL.

This Mediation course will explain what mediation is and how it works. We will learn about the mediation process and how to manage it. We will study the stages of negotiations and the elements, styles, strategies, and skills involved in problem solving. The classes will be interactive. We will discuss the nature of conflict and how values, emotions, barriers, cultural differences, confidentiality, and ethical issues impact the mediation process. We will examine the roles of the advocate and the mediator. Guest speakers will share their practical experiences. There will be mock mediation exercises with role playing and critiquing.

Schedule- TBA

LAW 994 Advanced Legal Topics – International Human Rights and Comparative Disability Law

Taught by Arlene Kanter, Professor of Law & Director for both Disability Law & Policy and International Programs, tentative dates Monday, January 6 to Friday, January 10 in Dineen Hall, Syracuse, NY. This is a three credits course.

This course examines the application of international human rights law to persons with disabilities. We begin the course with an overview of the theories, treaties, tribunals, and actors in the field of international human rights law. We then focus on the most recent treaty, the Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD), which was adopted by the United Nations in 2006. We will explore its history, content, and the extent to which it is being implemented – or not  –  in various countries around the world. Professor Kanter assisted in drafting the CRPD at the UN and has since worked with more than 20 countries on implementing this treaty. This course aims to provide an understanding of the international human rights and regional human rights legal systems as well as strategies used by disability rights advocates to address contemporary challenges to the enforcement of human rights protections for people with disabilities. No prior knowledge of international human rights law or disability law is required.

Schedule- TBA

Taught by Ted Pearce, L’77, Counsel at Bradley Law Firm – Monday, January 13 to Thursday, January 16, 2025 in Charlotte, NC.
We look forward to hosting Franchising Law again in Charlotte, NC with alumnus Ted Pearce. Back by popular demand, Professor Pearce will provide students with a deep dive into franchising law. More details to come!

With one-third out of every retail dollar being spent at a franchised establishment, the complexities of the franchise model are little understood by many attorneys. This course will introduce the student to the franchise business model and the related legal issues surrounding the franchise relationship. In addition to the learning how franchising incorporates principles of, contract law, antitrust concepts, intellectual property, real estate, and government regulation, the student will learn the practical applications of these legal disciplines relative to the franchise model. The course will incorporate lectures, class discussion, and problem solving involving real-world franchise relationship issues. Students will come to appreciate the legal positions taken by the franchisor and the franchisee in navigating these legal issues. During the course student will simulate a preliminary injunction hearing to enforce various post franchise contract termination remedies.